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MONDAY MORNING QUARTERBACK DIGEST #13

June 4, 2018

Monday Morning Quarterback Marketing Digest. Welcome to June! Here are some marketing and research thoughts that could help you this week.

FORGET FACEBOOK IF YOU ARE TRYING TO REACH TEENS. As mention in previous posts, Facebook is now a great way to reach parents and grandparents, but not teens. I mean, why would any self-respecting teen use something that their parents use? Want to reach teens, shift your advertising eye to: YouTube, Instagram and Snapchat. Those are the most popular online platforms among teens. Fully 95% of teens have access to a smartphone, and 45% say they are online ‘almost constantly’… a bit frightening.

According to a new PEW survey, half (51%) of U.S. teens ages 13 to 17 say they use Facebook, notably lower than YouTube, Instagram or Snapchat. This shift in teens’ social media use is just one example of how the things have changed for young people since PEW’s last survey of teens in 2014-2015. For the most part, teens tend to use similar platforms regardless of their demographics, but there are exceptions. Lower-income teens (living in households that make less than $30,000 a year) use Facebook more than those living in higher-income households of $75,000 or more a year. If you want to learn more, click here for the complete story.

SAY YOUR SORRY, BUT DON’T OVER DO IT. The Roseanne and Samantha Bee comments and then apologies, points out that we live in the age of apologies, sincere or otherwise. As reported by the Wall St. Journal, companies are spending millions of dollars to make their mea culpas a part of their ad strategies. Once confined to a full-page newspaper ad at best, apology campaigns from Uber, Facebook and Wells Fargo have expanded from print to digital, billboards and TV.

“The cost of a crisis campaign can now be up to 20 times what it was in 2000,” said Edelman PR firm’s Harlan Loeb, global chair of crisis (can you believe they have a title like that?). Facebook had spent $30 million on TV commercials. But there is a danger of apology fatigue. So, yes, tell consumers you were a jerk, but then move on.

ARE PUBLIC OPINIONS BASED ON FACT OR FICTION? In my marketing book, I point out that public opinions are created by events. People simply do not have an opinion on most things until something happens (an event) and then they form opinions. But in this age of fake news, does that event have to be real? No.

For example, there is simply no truth to “Spygate,” the President’s belief that someone was planted as a spy in his campaign. Yet, by just making a public accusation (the event), most people now have an opinion on it. Public opinions of men that have been accused of sexual misbehavior have changed because of the charge (the event), not necessarily the facts. Another example, accepting refugees. A PEW study shows that half of Americans (51%) say yes we should accept refugees. However, 62% of Republicans say no and 74% of Democrats say yes. Today, public opinion is being created by the 24/7 partisan stories shared on social media. That is why researching people’s opinions today is far more challenging. It is also why we are doing far more awareness and opinion studies for clients. If you need to know what your customer things of you, we can help.

That is all for this week. Let me know if there are any specific research or marketing questions you are thinking about that I can cover in my weekly update.

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